The Economics Network conducts regular surveys to research the current state of teaching and learning in Economics Higher Education in the UK. They inform our support role and give a voice to the HE Economics community.

We only publish national results, recognising that the data must not be used for league tables. For the student surveys, departments receive their own confidential report, which they can then compare to the national picture.

Employer Surveys

The Employers' Surveys conducted by the Economics Network aim to improve understanding of the skills economics graduates need in the workplace, to establish whether employers think these graduates generally possess the required skills and knowledge and to reveal any clear shortfalls in order to inform the UK economics academic community.


In 2010 we also released "How Economics Students are Prepared for Employment" (pdf), a summary of findings from the alumni and employer surveys.

National Surveys of Economics Lecturers

The main objective of this survey is to clarify current practices and issues of concern to Economics lecturers and their students, as well as provide the Economics Network and those who fund us with information about how economics lecturers use our services and what impact it has on their teaching.

The most recent survey was conducted in 2011: Executive summary | Full report.

Also available:

In previous surveys, lecturers reported a lack of support and positive incentives from their departments for teaching innovation. Despite this, they are making changes to their teaching methodology, although "chalk and talk" remains dominant.

Previous lecturer surveys: 2011 | 2009 | 2007 | 2005 | 2003 | 2001

Alumni Survey (Economics Graduates)

The Economics Network conducts surveys of alumni, to investigate the knowledge and skills acquired in an Economics degree and their relevance to their job and career.

The most recent survey of alumni ran until December 2008: Executive summary | Full report

The previous Alumni survey was conducted in 2004. National aggregate results can be downloaded in PDF format.

National Surveys of Economics Students

The Economics Network's student surveys ask students about their pre-university learning experience and to evaluate their current courses and learning experience in economics. 

In surveys so far, the quality and enthusiasm of the teaching staff emerged as a main determinant of the quality of the student experience. Economics itself came in for a great deal of praise as an interesting and challenging subject. The students have also shown a demand for active involvement in learning.

The most recent survey was conducted in 2012 and the survey report can be downloaded here.

Previous student surveys: 2010 | 2008 | 2006 | 2004 | 2002

National Survey of Economics Departments 2001

Our 2001 survey of Economics Departments gave a national overview of teaching practice, involving 40 department contacts. The responses showed the rate of use of various teaching and assessment styles and technologies. A short summary of the results is available.

Other HE Surveys

National Student Survey (NSS)

The results of the National Student Survey, plus other Teaching Quality Information (TQI) data are available on the Unistats site.

The Economics Network Student Focus Group Scheme further investigated student attitudes emerging from the NSS. We facilitated eighteen focus groups between 2009 and 2011.

Reports for the emerging themes from focus groups are available for: 2009/10 | 2010/11 

The Key contacts conference 2009 included a presentation by Prof. Alison Wride (Exeter University) on Improving your National Student Survey scores.

Key Information Sets

The Economics Network has compiled the KIS data for economics that's available on the Unistats website and made it available in a single downloadable file.

Latest research

2014-15 Employers' Survey

Overview of results

Trends in Economics Education

Applications, A-levels and demographics (updated March 2015)

Undergraduate degrees in Economics in the UK (2013)

A report comparing BA and BSc degrees, and degrees given within and outside business schools