Video and Audio Lectures in History of Economic Thought

The Liberty Fund

Audio interviews, of about an hour length, with a variety of figures including Milton Friedman, Ronald Coase, and Gary Becker. The files are downloadable in MP3 in other formats.

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Shivakumar, Indian Institute of Technology Madras

Thirty-six video lectures of around fifty minutes each, with topics covering the whole span of economic ideas.

Standard YouTube Licence
Economic History Society

The Tawney lecture is the annual lecture from the Economic History Society and this page presents videos of the lecture from 2007 onwards. Topics covered include: Why was the Industrial Revolution British?, Nature as historical protagonist and Twentieth Century famines as economic history. The videos are presented as Flash files to be viewed online and last just over an hour each.

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James Heckman and Robert Lucas, University of Chicago

This is part of the University of Chicago series Mind Online. In this talk James Heckman, Professor of Economics and Public Policy who won the Nobel Prize in Economics in 2000, and Robert Lucas, Jr., Professor of Economics who won the Nobel Prize in Economics in 1995, discuss Milton Friedman's work and influence. It is available as a QuickTime video or an mp3 audio download.

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Bob Marks, Australian Graduate School of Management

Professor Joan Robinson (1903-1983) was a guest professor at Stanford University in May 1974. Robinson was a member of Keynes inner circle as he wrote the General Theory, and later became a strident critic of textbook economics. This webpage features partial recordings of her guest lectures amounting to over 3 hours of mp3 audio files. Topics covered: What is Wrong with Neoclassical Economics?, Traditional Economics is Inappropriate for Developing Economics, Socialist Economies and Consumer Sovereignty.

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