Video and Audio Lectures in Advanced Microeconomics

Scott E. Page, University of Michigan

A series of twenty lectures from a free online course that ran in 2012. Each is broken into chunks of about ten minutes. The video format shows the speaker's face along with slides that he annotates live. Topics include decision theory, economic growth, Markov chains, fitting lines to data, linear and non-linear models, agent-based models, co-ordination problems in game theory, networks, random walks, and auctions, among others.

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Raj Chetty, Harvard University

Twenty-eight lectures of roughly one hour each from a one-semester graduate course delivered in late 2014. "This one-semester course covers basic issues in the optimal design of tax and social insurance policies, with emphasis on combining theoretical models with empirical evidence. Topics include efficiency costs and incidence of taxation, income taxation, transfer and welfare programs, public goods and externalities, optimal social insurance (excluding social security), and welfare analysis in behavioral models."

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Glen Weyl, University of Chicago

Seventeen video lectures with PDF slides from a course delivered in 2011. Each lecture is available in two versions: a "regular" version and "turbo" version which covers a bit more material. "The first part of this course discusses markets with one or a few suppliers. The second part focuses on demand and supply for factors of production and the distribution of income in the economy. This course also includes some elementary general equilibrium theory and welfare economics."

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Glen Weyl, University of Chicago

Seventeen video lectures, with slides in PDF format and teaching notes on specific topics, from a joint undergraduate/graduate course "that seeks to show the unity of classical Marshallian price theory with topics of recent interest in industrial organization, public finance, international trade and particularly the design of social institutions." The course was delivered in Fall 2013

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Daniel Kahneman, Princeton University

Maps of bounded rationality : a perspective on intuitive judgement and choice is Daniel Kahneman's 2002 Nobel Prize lecture, reviewing psychological and behavioural perspectives on economic choice following from his pioneering work with Amos Tversky. Includes a summary of their 'prospect theory', an alternative to rational choice theory that is consistent with their empirically discovered judgement biases, and a review of evidence for the main heuristics and their associated biases. Available as text or as a video of the lecture.

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