Video and Audio Lectures in Principles of Macroeconomics

Department of Economics, University of Utah

This department's YouTube channel has around a hundred videos, organised into playlists about international economics, macro principles, intermediate macro,  and statistics for social and behavioural sciences.

Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY)
Department of Economics, University of South Africa

Hundreds of videos (mostly in English, but some in Afrikaans) on economic principles. Some are in chalk-and-talk format, while others use narrated animation. They are organised by topic into playlists. The most popular videos are the Keynesian multiplier, the IS-LM model, and absolute and comparative advantage.

Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY)
Office for National Statistics

Five minute animated video "explaining what is included within Balance of Payments before focusing on the current account. It then shows the credits and debits within the current account from 1955 onwards before showing the surplus or deficits in each year. Finally it shows the different contributions to the current deficit in 2010."

Open Government Licence
K. K. Fung, University of Memphis

About two dozen short animated lectures and online slide shows for micro and macroeconomics. The slides are in a Flash format which does not allow editing, but allows readers to step through and recap. They use animation to build up graphs and show their interrelation.

Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike (CC-BY-SA)
Jonathan Michie, Linda Yueh, and Martin Slater, University of Oxford

A podcast series about the credit crunch and global recession featuring three Oxford academics. This series examines how the current crisis developed, analyses market and government responses to it, and looks at what might happen next. Eight audio files are available with most programmes lasting around 30 minutes.

Creative Commons Attribution NonCommercial ShareAlike (CC-BY-NC-SA)
Center for Economic and Policy Research

10 lectures by US economists downloadable as streamed video or MP3 audio presentations, with accompanying PowerPoint slides and related papers that pursue the issues in more depth. Two lectures are on growth (Dean Baker, Mark Weisbrot), others on US labour markets (John Schmitt), women in the labour market (Heather Boushey), trade (Mark Weisbrot), intergenerational mobility and life chances (Heather Boushey), the Federal Reserve, asset bubbles and intellectual property (all Dean Baker). The lectures are US-focused and reflect the sometimes market-critical perspective of the Center for Economic Policy and Research, a think-tank founded by Baker and Weisbrot in 1999 with an advisory board including Joseph Stiglitz and Robert Solow (not to be confused with the UK-based Centre for Economic Policy Research).

Creative Commons Attribution NonCommercial ShareAlike (CC-BY-NC-SA)
Jonathan Jarvis, JonathanJarvis.com

The Crisis of Credit is an 11 minute animation explaining the origins of the credit crunch in the United States. It covers the interaction of homeowners, mortgage lenders, investors and financial institutions that produced the global financial crisis. It provides simple explanations of a number of complex terms and systems, delivering an effective introduction to the topic. Users will need a Flash based video player to watch the animation.

Creative Commons Attribution NonCommercial NoDerivatives (CC-BY-NC-ND)
Videolectures.net

This collection of videos covers financial markets, econometrics, markets and macroeconomics. It includes videos from Yale, European events and other economists. Videos typically last 30 minutes to an hour and often take the form of lectures or conference discussions.

Creative Commons Attribution NonCommercial NoDerivatives (CC-BY-NC-ND)
Mary McGlasson

This is a collection of more than three dozen short YouTube videos, featuring narrated drawings and slides, to illustrate basic concepts in macroeconomics.

Creative Commons Attribution NonCommercial NoDerivatives (CC-BY-NC-ND)
Jason G. Welker, Zurich International School

Welker's Wikinomics is a set of online resources for teachers and students of International Baccalaureate Economics. The video resources include around 100 video tutorials of about ten minutes each, uploaded during 2012. They use a narrated-diagram format to explain concepts in basic micro-, macro- and international economics. Each category also has flashcards, a glossary and worksheets.

Creative Commons Attribution NonCommercial NoDerivatives (CC-BY-NC-ND)
FreeVideoLectures

FreeVideoLectures brings together videos of economics courses from Universities such as Yale and Berkeley, as well as online providers like the Khan Academy. They are arranged by topics, including: international economics, trade, game theory, history of economic thought and economic demography. Items are listed by course enabling students to work through a course chronologically.

Mix of licences
K. K. Fung, University of Memphis

A series of short, animated YouTube videos explaining basic macro concepts, including multipliers; deficit and debt; and crowding out.

Standard YouTube Licence
Joseph Stiglitz, Columbia University; Fora.tv

This thought-provoking but accessible video clip is taken from a TV programme featuring the Nobel prize winning economist Joseph Stiglitz. In it he talks about weaknesses of using GDP as a measure, for example in terms of sustainability. He also reminds listeners of the difference between GNP and GDP. It lasts approximately eight minutes.

Standard YouTube Licence
Paul Krugman, Princeton University

This YouTube video features 2008 Nobel Laureate Paul Krugman of Princeton University, speaking as part of the Authors@Google series. Instead of speaking about his book The Conscience of a Liberal, Krugman talks about the financial crisis, banking meltdown and credit crunch - several months before it actually happened, as the event took place on December 14, 2007. Krugman looks at the causes of the current crisis and then goes on to offer some possible ways out.

Standard YouTube Licence
Jacob Clifford

Clifford, an Advanced Placement Economics teacher based in California, uses YouTube to share many short videos of him explaining economic concepts, organised into playlists around micro and macro concepts. As of the start of 2012, his economics videos have had more than a million views. They are freely reusable for non-commerical purposes.

Standard YouTube Licence
Jodi Beggs, Northwestern University

This project includes more than one hundred YouTube videos aimed at introductory university-level economics, with a wide range of durations. Lecturer and columnist Beggs announces new videos and blog posts video through Facebook, Twitter, Google Plus and other platforms.

Standard YouTube Licence
Roger K. Strickland

The videos on this YouTube channel are extracted from lectures in economics and in Managerial Finance, including some made direct to camera. They are organised into playlists around different themes including "Macroeconomics - basic models" and "Linear Demand Elasticities". The lecturer is based in an unspecified US institution.

Standard YouTube Licence
Mark Blyth, Brown University

This 5'35", subtitled YouTube video combines lively presentation with animation to argue that austerity is not the appropriate response to the financial crisis. Blyth is professor of International Political Economy at Brown University and author of "Austerity: History of a dangerous idea". A version of the video with Portugese subtitles is also available.

Standard YouTube Licence
Robert B. Reich

This 57 minute talk, put online in September 2011, reflects on causes of the 2008 financial crisis and the role of inequality.

Standard YouTube Licence
Le Monde

Though this YouTube channel of well-produced, narrated illustrations is mostly in French, the linked playlist has several with English text and narration, on topics including "What is Comparative Advantage?", "How can a country go bankrupt?", and "How does bad news affect the economy?" and "What is the Budget Wall?" Content is approved by academic economists as well as by Le Monde.

Standard YouTube Licence
British Broadcasting Corporation

This archive of 20+-minute interviews includes some of economists, politicians and academics speaking on economic issues. They include former Chancellor Alastair Darling, Christine Lagarde of the IMF, Richard Thaler, and Statistician Nate Silver.

Standard YouTube Licence
Thomas Piketty, Paris School of Economics

An 87-minute video from a public lecture given by Piketty at the London School of Economics and Political Science in June 2014. After a three-minute introduction, Piketty speaks for 53 minutes about the themes of his book "Capital in the 21st Century" and the rest of the video is the question-and-answer session.

Standard YouTube Licence
Paul Krugman, Princeton University

Part of the Nobel prize website, this page provides resources related to the 2008 winner Paul Krugman of Princeton University. It includes the video of his Nobel lecture - New trade, new geography and the troubles of manufacturing - that focuses on economic geography and trade, comcluding that: increasing returns have been a powerful force shaping the world economy, that force may actually be in decline, but that decline itself is a key to understanding much of what is happening in the world today. Users will need Windows Media Player or RealPlayer to view the lecture. The site also includes supporting materials, such as interviews, lecture slides and press releases.

All Rights Reserved
PBS Now

Archived on this page are links to particular PBS NOW stories relating to economics. The links take to story pages that often include further links to video, transcripts, data and side stories. The archives go from 2002 to the present.

All Rights Reserved
James Murray and John Nunley, University of Wisconsin - La Crosse

Dozens of "pencasts" (audio narrated pen animations) on introductory topics. The site requires Flash player.

All Rights Reserved

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