This site is currently under development as part of the TRUE (Teaching Resources for Undergraduate Economics) project.

TRUE: Labour Economics

Welcome to Labour Economics Education! Thanks for stopping by. Our aims are:

  • To encourage and support pluralism in the teaching and learning of economics in UK universities.
  • To encourage and support the teaching and learning of labour economics in UK universities.
  • To create a community of economics teachers willing to share ideas, resources and expertise in economics teaching.

Labour Economics Education is led by Professor Monojit Chatterji (m.chatterji@dundee.ac.uk), Bonar Professor of Applied Economics, University of Dundee, Dundee, Scotland.

This page, and the pages linked from it via the navigation bar on the left, are part of the TRUE project, aiming to make teaching resources in economics freely available online.

Pages for each of the 14 TRUE specialist areas are Wikis: to edit them, all you have to do is to ask for a login and password. The same login details will work for all of the specialist areas, so you only need to do this once. If you teach degree-level economics, please consider signing up, by sending me an email (at m.chatterji@dundee.ac.uk), so that you can upload your teaching materials and edit the pages in other ways.

If you teach a module with any labour economics, human resource economics, or personnel economics content, please contribute your teaching materials - syllabus, reading list, lecture notes and PowerPoints, handouts and exam papers, etc - by uploading them to one of the pages you can see linked to on the navigation bar.

For the other 13 specialist areas, the emphasis is on second and third year options ( third and fourth year in Scotland), as it was felt by project leaders that core micro, macro and quants at all levels are relatively well provided for by textbooks and open content through the web, but there was much less open availability of resources in specialist areas.

Student recruitment

Why study a module in Labour Economics? Short essay by Stephen Drinkwater, University of Surrey for the Economics Network's site for students, StudyingEconomics.

Intellectual property

Intellectual property of contributed material will remain with its present owners. You are encouraged to license the materials you contribute as Creative Commons. This will mean placing a statement "This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License" (with a link to the licence) with the link to and description of every resource which is contributed. Please refer to the Economics Network advice sheet for content authors on why and how to license their materials.

Teaching Resources for Undergraduate Economics

Creative Commons License Except where stated, resources on this page are available under a Creative Commons by-nc licence.

Logos remain the property of their respective institutions and organisations, all rights reserved.

Takedown policy